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"My Basic Income": Michael Bohmeyer's Story

More than exercise or diet, income is the leading factor in determining our health, with poverty being the root cause of poor health for so many Canadians.

Enter: basic income. That is, a minimum income below which no Canadian would fallan idea that could make an enormous difference to our collective, long-term well-being. 

But beyond keeping us healthy, a minimum annual income could also revolutionize the way we look at our time, our relationships, and our work, truly challenging the idea of what's good for us.

Check out this interview with Michael Bohmeyer, a German 29-year old who decided to stop working and instead live off the $1300/month he gets from his tech startup. Bohmeyer might get you thinking-

"What would you spend your time doing if your basic needs were met?"

We came across this interview by Chris Köver at Vice.com

IMG-bohmeyer.jpgPhoto by Jannismayr.de

...

You said that having an unconditional basic income has radically altered your life. How so?
After I stopped working earlier this year and started living off the approximately $1,300 I get out of my company, I just wanted to put my feet up and do nothing. Instead, I found a crazy drive to do things. I had a million new business ideas, I take care of my daughter, and I work for a local community radio. I buy less shit, I live healthier, and I'm a better boyfriend and father.

Because you have more time for your girlfriend and daughter?
Because I'm more laid-back. The pressure is gone. My working conditions were great even before, because I was running my own company and could pretty much do what I want. But making money was tied to conditions. Now, I do everything I do because I want to—and all of a sudden it’s twice as much fun.

“My Basic Income” is keeping me busy 20 out of 24 hours. I’m not kidding—I barely sleep. All of a sudden I have these insane amounts of energy, because I'm doing 100 percent what I want to do.

Do you ever get bored?
I wouldn’t have the time. “My Basic Income” is keeping me busy 20 out of 24 hours. I’m not kidding—I barely sleep. All of a sudden I have these insane amounts of energy, because I'm doing 100 percent what I want to do.

So ever since you stopped working for money, you've been working your ass off. Kind of ironic.
Totally. It’s also funny how I got there. After I had stopped working for pay initially, I thought I’d have to immediately find a new project. I rented an office, made a to-do list, and showed up in the morning. After stressing myself out like that for a month and not getting much done, I thought, Wait a minute. What the hell am I doing? So I actively made myself do nothing for a month—I watched the sky, no cell phone, no books, nothing. It was physically painful. But after a while I could do it.

I think that everybody has crazy potential that could be triggered by not having to worry about income.

You want to pay someone a basic income of $1,300 a month for a year, no strings attached. What do you hope to prove or find out by doing this?
I was pretty astonished what not having to work did to my life. It would be presumptuous to make assumptions based on my experience, but I think that everybody has crazy potential that could be triggered by not having to worry about income. Don’t get me wrong, I think making money is awesome. To work and be paid for it—that’s great. But not to work for the sole purpose of making money. I got bored by the debates we're having about this issue and how they are not going anywhere. So I thought: Let’s just try this and see what happens instead of waiting around for politicians.

Through crowdfunding you've raised close to $32,000 so far—enough money to finance two basic incomes for a year. That’s two people not having to worry about getting by. Still, it doesn’t say a lot about what would happen if none of us had to worry about that.
Sure, my project is totally dumb for two reasons. First it’s limited to one year, so you still have to worry about making a living next year. And secondly, of course it makes a difference if it’s just me not having to worry about money or if nobody around me does.

In the long run we’d see people making freer choices, because they wouldn’t have to make decisions based on economic pressure—only based on what they actually want. They’d have time to actually think about what it is that they want or they are good at.

So no, it’s definitely not representative. But at least we get a whiff of what having a basic income might feel like. And we're having a discussion about this. Because it’s not just about the two who are actually going to win this. It’s also about the 21,000 people who wrote on the website what they’d do if they had the money. They aren't looking to put their feet up. They want to continue working without having to stress so much—they’d like to volunteer more or start their own company. I think all of these things would be pretty rad for society.

So what do you think would happen if we all had basic income tomorrow?
At first, nothing much would change. But in the long run we’d see people making freer choices, because they wouldn’t have to make decisions based on economic pressure—only based on what they actually want. They’d have time to actually think about what it is that they want or they are good at. Now, you're just trying to get through school quickly so you can get a good job.

I'm not just addressing the privileged here. Having a basic income puts everybody into a better position when it comes to negotiating with their employers.

OK, you are talking about privileged people with university degrees who actually expect their jobs to not just pay the rent but also be fun, rewarding, and fulfilling. What about the underpaid who are cleaning toilets, working in call centers, or taking care of the old?
I'm not just addressing the privileged here. Having a basic income puts everybody into a better position when it comes to negotiating with their employers. The guy cleaning the toilet could say, "Nope, not doing that any more." The employer could then say, "Let’s automate this and we’ll only have self-cleaning toilets from now on."

Yeah, but it’s hard to automate taking care of children or the old.
Exactly. In these cases, we’d finally have to ask ourselves what we value in society. We’ll have to start paying these people way better. I think having clean toilets is important. It’s work that needs to be done, but it is done today at the expense of people who can’t afford to get another job. And I don’t know anyone who’d say child care isn’t important—yet we have people doing this work for the lowest possible pay, because no profit is to be made.

We’d finally have to ask ourselves what we value in society.

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The group of people advocating a basic income is a pretty mixed bunch—from leftists, member of the Green Party, and anthroposophists to Milton Friedmanites and members of the German Liberal Party. Where on this spectrum do you fall?
Nowhere. Basic income doesn’t fit this left-right diagram. It’s partly socialist, because it’s about giving everybody the same. It’s also individualistic, because it’s about lean government and less bureaucracy. It’s neither left-wing nor right-wing; it’s a third road. 

Today, politicians use it as a sociopolitical tool to get people to do what they want them to do. I think this strategy has gotten old, and it’s not working. Let’s give people some money and see what they do with it if they can decide for themselves.

I want to show that most everybody would do something useful with their lives l if they had the money—it’s not just you. People want to contribute. You just have to let them.

"The myth of full employment and the idea that everyone who doesn’t have a job is just not trying hard enough." What do you think of that?
That’s bullshit. In modern capitalism you can never have full employment. Having a reserve army of unemployed workforce at all times is necessary to keep the low-pay sector as a low-pay sector. There just isn’t enough paid labor for everybody. At the same time we are forcing people to take jobs that aren’t there. That’s just cruel.

Any other myths you’d like to bust?
People say, "Of course I would continue working if I had a basic income, but the others wouldn’t." That’s where I want to start. I want to show that most everybody would do something useful with their lives l if they had the money—it’s not just you. People want to contribute. You just have to let them.

 If you look at the 1.4 million people we already have in Germany today who could rely on welfare but prefer to work even though their job doesn’t pay enough for them to make a living—I’d say we can be fairly sure that people aren’t generally looking to be lazy.

People say a lot of things when asked. It doesn't mean they are actually going to do it.
Sure. But if you look at the 1.4 million people we already have in Germany today who could rely on welfare but prefer to work even though their job doesn’t pay enough for them to make a living—I’d say we can be fairly sure that people aren’t generally looking to be lazy. Even with the system we have now.

How would a basic income change your life? Would your relationships improve? How would it affect your mental health? Would you pursue a business idea? Would you be able to run for office? Upgrade your education? Volunteer more often? What would our society look like if this were a reality for all people?

 

Showing 5 reactions

  • followed this page 2015-12-15 13:18:12 -0600
  • commented 2014-10-24 15:57:00 -0600
    Hmm, I am a senior on a combination pension-GIS that gives me about $1300 a month. Health concerns—my husband’s that is—do tie me down a little, but I still have time and energy to do some of the things I’ve always longed to do. It’s a great pity that people have to wait till 65-68 to have the freedom to contribute as they wish rather than as a wage-slave, and then cannot due to health issues.
  • @RanaMjaved576 tweeted link to this page. 2014-09-07 09:01:12 -0600
    "My Basic Income": Michael Bohmeyer's Story. What would you spend your time doing if your basic needs were met? http://www.thinkupstream.net/_my_basic_income?recruiter_id=9647
  • posted about this on Facebook 2014-09-07 09:01:12 -0600
    "My Basic Income": Michael Bohmeyer's Story. What would you spend your time doing if your basic needs were met?
  • commented 2014-09-05 15:46:47 -0600
    The fundamental issue is that we need to stop relying on corporations to create jobs. That’s not what they do. They exist solely to create profit. They do this by lowering wages and/or decreasing the number of workers (jobs) required to get that profit. Yet both left and right leaning governments continue to try to manipulate corporations (through tax breaks and other programs) into creating jobs and/or raising wages. They WON’T create jobs OR raise wages. This is a MISGUIDED IDEOLOGY. Instead, corporations will take this ‘corporate welfare’ and hoard the profits in offshore tax havens, getting richer while the country goes deeper and deeper into debt. This ideology has NEVER worked, and it never will.

    So let’s get real. It is a mathematical fact that corporations do NOT provide enough jobs (or wages) for the population . . . period. It is also a fact that CONSUMERS create jobs, not corporations, because NO jobs are created if no one buys products (consumer demand).

    It’s time for the “Third Way”. The Unconditional Basic Income.

    This one, simple economic change could solve inequality, homelessness, poverty, unemployment, welfare, pensions AND the minimum wage issue all at once, and reverse the recession almost overnight. It’s the ‘Third Way’ that can break the Left/Right ideological impasse. Trying to manipulate banks and corporations into creating jobs is an economic ideology that has proven itself futile. This new ‘Third Way’ supports innovation by allowing corporations (including small businesses) to focus on profit and frees them from having to provide social services and jobs. It also frees people from living under the thumb of government-run social programs such as welfare or oppressive work situations.

    In an Unconditional Basic Income (UBI) system, everyone gets the same amount, rich or poor, working or not, and there’s NO MEANS TESTING, so NO new government bureaucracies. People can choose to work and can make as much money as they want to ABOVE the UBI so capitalism remains intact.

    If the Swiss referendum passes, it could herald a new day for humanity.

    The simplicity of the idea is it’s beauty. It has been supported by both left and right leaning politicians as a way to eliminate poverty and avoid violent revolution. Both Milton Friedman and Martin Luther King supported the idea of a Basic Income.

    It can be funded by diverting most present social service funds into this more efficient model and then shutting down large numbers of government departments EXCEPT education and medical. (Theoretically, the UBI can be run on a single computer that transfers the UBI into everyone’s bank account automatically every month.) Another source of funding could be a Financial Transaction Tax (a tiny percentage taken off every stock market transaction). (This would also address the out-of-control microsecond computer trading issue on the stock markets.) There is an estimated $21 trillion missing from the global economy because it is hoarded in off-shore tax havens for multinational corporations and the richest 10%. I think this is the place to look for missing tax dollars. If we tax these corporations properly, (i.e., stop giving them subsidies in the mistaken hope that they will create jobs) then we will force them to bring that offshore tax haven money back into the general economy.

    But either way, businesses would not have to pay for the UBI. A UBI is different than a minimum wage because employers do not pay for a UBI. It is funded through taxes. Employers in low wage industries could retain those low wages because people would no longer NEED high wages if they are just working to add to their Basic Income.

    There would be no inflation as long as the UBI is funded through taxes and not through ‘printing’ money. (Inflation is caused by money creation in excess of demand.) Employers also won’t need to inflate prices because they won’t have to increase wages. In fact, a UBI would be better for business as there would be more people buying products. Business would increase overnight. Instant consumer demand and instant stimulation WITHOUT government intervention! ADDITIONALLY, as proven in pilot projects, a UBI will cause a doubling of small businesses as people use the UBI as startup capital. This increases market supply and competition thus further reducing the possibility of inflation. The UBI increases consumer demand AND market supply together, thereby avoiding inflation while growing the economy. It’s a win-win.

    Wherever a UBI has been tried, people worked more, not less, and started small businesses. That’s because the money was adequate enough that they didn’t need to go into debt to the banks to ask for a startup loan. For instance, in Dauphin, Canada’s “Mincome” experiment and in Omitara, Namibia, crime decreased, health care costs went down, and the overall economy improved. Two basic income pilot projects have been underway in India since January 2011 resulting in better food, better healthcare, better children’s school performance, a tripling of personal savings and a doubling of new business startups, all leaving the overall economy much healthier than before the UBI.

    Because there is NO MEANS TESTING, no extra bureaucracy would be needed. We have many unpaid workers in our society. Volunteers, artists, musicians, homemakers, grandmothers, etc. It’s now time that they were valued monetarily by society. Most of them are shut out from being consumers because of poverty.

    It’s time for REAL change – an Unconditional Basic Income! But politicians won’t do anything this radically positive without a grassroots uprising from the people DEMANDING a UBI. So tell your friends (copy and paste this blurb) and help make the UBI go viral!
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