Fair systems make healthy nations

How many of us have voted for someone in an election who didn't win? The answer is probably everyone. If we think about it, this means that your vote didn't count. But it's not just yours... in a way, it's everyone's.

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Vote 4 Health

Let's vote for what will make Canada a better place for all.

This election, let's #Vote4Health.

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Political engagement is good for your health

Leadnow began as an online engagement organization, designed to mobilize individuals and communities to push forward political issues like our democracy, environment and economy — all factors that determine our ability to lead healthy lives.

They have since expanded their ground game, organizing people face-to-face, and tapping into people power to make real change and shift the balance of power to focus on the most important issues of our time.

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Jobs and Income

The Wellesley Institute and Upstream have partnered to bring to you a closer look at the health impacts of the policies that our national parties are putting forth. We know that social factors  — where you live, age, play and work — have a big impact on your health, so we ask, what are our political leaders doing to address them?

Over the next few weeks as we count down to election day, we will be looking at social issues that impact our health and reporting on how the party platforms lineup. Our health should be considered in all policies.

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Housing

The Wellesley Institute and Upstream have partnered to bring to you a closer look at the health impacts of the policies that our national parties are putting forth. We know that social factors  — where you live, age, play and work — have a big impact on your health, so we ask, what are our political leaders doing to address them?

Over the next few weeks as we count down to election day, we will be looking at social issues that impact our health and reporting on how the party platforms lineup. Our health should be considered in all policies.

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Pharmacare

The Wellesley Institute and Upstream have partnered to bring to you a closer look at the health impacts of the policies that our national parties are putting forth. We know that social factors  — where you live, age, play and work — have a big impact on your health, so we ask, what are our political leaders doing to address them?

Over the next few weeks as we count down to election day, we will be looking at social issues that impact our health and reporting on how the party platforms lineup. Our health should be considered in all policies.

 

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Giving Canadians a solid floor to stand on

Beyond a multitude of healthcare savings, a basic income would improve educational outcomes, lower crime rates, and provide financial remuneration for care work – to say nothing of the moral imperative of eradicating poverty and food insecurity in Canada.

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Upstream Radio: Seeking a cure for poverty

Poverty is incredibly complicated, and has all sorts of causes and factors. That's why the Saskatchewan government last winter appointed an advisory group to examine what opportunities we can seize to raise people out of poverty. Just this week, the advisory group dropped a list of recommendations for what we should do.

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Upstream Applauds AGPR Recommendations for Poverty Reduction

Upstream is encouraged by the recommendations, released today, by the Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction and urges the Government to adopt and implement these recommendations to the benefit of all Saskatchewan residents.

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Dreaming Healthy Nations: Basic income as an Indigenous value

After being elected to the students' union for the first time, nohta (my father) told me, "Okimawak (chiefs) didn't used to have very much for themselves — they would give away most of what they had to those who needed it."

In nehiyaw (Cree) culture, those who accepted the responsibility of leadership were expected to sacrifice for the community, while being rooted in compassion and selflessness. This was a powerful lesson that stayed with me, and was cemented by many more Indigenous knowledge keepers throughout my journey as an elected person.

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Connect upstream.