Expanding our criteria for healthy living

“The world is not a problem to be solved; it is a living being to which we belong. The world is part of our own self and we are a part of its own suffering wholeness." 

-Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

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Harry Leslie Smith stands up for progress

92-year-old veteran and activist Harry Leslie Smith is visiting Regina, June 25th, as part of the Broadbent Institute’s Stand Up for Progress Tour. In advance of his visit he spoke with Saskatoon physician Ryan Meili about his history and his vision for the future.

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Dreaming Healthy Nations: Closing the gap

This spring I drove up five hours to visit friends in a Northern Saskatchewan Métis community. The crosses that mark the side of the highway, more frequent the further north I go, remind me that these small communities have suffered too much loss the past winter. But I don’t see that once I arrive; the community is beautiful, a hub for fishing, hunting.

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This post builds on an earlier post by Max.

In the spirit of building healthier relationships, here's the second feature in a new series of articles for Upstream by Max FineDay, a young nêhiyaw leader who recently finished his second term as president of the University of Saskatchewan Student's Union. In this series, Max explores the concept of the social determinants of health through an Indigenous lens, and the types of upstream interventions that could improve health outcomes for Indigenous peoples. In his own words, "My goal in this project is to explore how that idea relates to Indigenous lives, and how it might help us chart a way to a healthier balance and healthier relationships in Canada."

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Dreaming Healthy Nations: Aboriginal status as a determinant of health

“I wonder how we can reconcile when the majority of Canadians do not understand the historic or contemporary injustice of dispossession and occupation”       -  Leanne Simpson

In the spirit of building healthier relationships, here's the second feature in a new series of articles for Upstream by Max FineDay, a young nēhiyaw leader who recently finished his second term as president of the University of Saskatchewan Student's Union. In this series, Max explores the concept of the social determinants of health through an Indigenous lens, and the types of upstream interventions that could improve health outcomes for Indigenous peoples. In his own words, "My goal in this project is to explore how that idea relates to Indigenous lives, and how it might help us chart a way to a healthier balance and healthier relationships in Canada." 

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Upstream in Prairies North

A few months ago, the Upstream team had the chance to sit down with Lionel Hughes from Prairies North Magazine and talk about the work we do and why it is so important.

Read the full article below and make sure to check out Prairies North website for more great Saskatchewan stories.

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From Surviving to Thriving: 3 key strategies for effective childcare advocacy

By David McGrane

As a parent of a three year-old and five year-old, I’m heavily involved in my tour of duty in the Saskatchewan childcare system. We’ve been lucky to find a wonderful childcare centre that educates our children in their first language- French. The early childhood educators have been caring, diligent, and helpful. Ensuring families have options for supportive early childhood development programs, including childcare, are crucial to better health outcomes later in life for our children.

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Dreaming Healthy Nations: Indigenous stories & the social determinants of health

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its final report today. This landmark document demonstrates the myriad ways in which the health and well-being of Indigenous peoples were damaged by Canada's residential school policies.

In the spirit of building healthier relationships, we're releasing the first in a new series of articles for Upstream by Max Fineday, a young nêhiyaw leader who recently finished his second term as president of the University of Saskatchewan Student's Union. In this series, Max will explore the concept of the social determinants of health through an Indigenous lens, and the types of upstream interventions that could improve health outcomes for Indigenous peoples. In his own words, "My goal in this project is to explore how that idea relates to Indigenous lives, and how it might help us chart a way to a healthier balance and healthier relationships in Canada."

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A Legacy Worth Building On

This blog is by David White, President of the Douglas-Coldwell Foundation.

David reflects on Canadian history and how addressing the social determinants of health has been at the heart of the work of some great Canadians.

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Social Change is at the Heart of Medicine: An Interview with CMA President Chris Simpson Part 2

Recently, I was fortunate to attend the Global Symposium on the Role of Physicians and National Medical Associations in Addressing Health Equity and the Social Determinants of Health held in London, England. The meeting was organized by the Canadian, British and World Medical Associations and had, among other goals, an agenda to assist public health pioneer Sir Michael Marmot in making such issues central to his upcoming role as president of the World Medical Association.

Among the attendees was Canadian Medical Association president Dr. Chris Simpson. I sat down with Dr. Simpson to explore the stories, the evidence and the politics that come into play when doctors are actors for social change.

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A learning point to take home from La Ronge, if you have one

By Jon Herriot

On my first day up in La Ronge during my rural family medicine rotation, I heard a story of a man who was found dead in a small homemade shack. His shack lit on fire and he burned to death, presumably during an attempt to heat his small shelter during a cold winter night.

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