Climate activists should focus on public health to inspire action

When we talk about climate change it can often seem like something abstract, or like something that our grandchildren will have to deal with.

According to the World Health Organization climate change is the biggest global health threat in the 21st century, and it’s not just being felt by people with breathing problems. climate change means more heat stress, more injuries from extreme weather; more prevalent diseases such as West Nile and Lyme disease - which is on the rise. So we are going to explore the link between climate change and public health in the present and in our future.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Want action on Climate Change? Push public health, not polar bears

Ed Maibach, professor and Director at the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University, was recently on CBC's The Current speaking to Priya Chattopadyay, following an interview with Ryan Meili, to discuss the relationships between Climate Change and Public Health in Canada.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Canadian democracy needs a check-up, for the future of citizen health

If Canadian democracy was a patient, it would be in the hallway on a gurney on its way to palliative care.

- Rick Mercer, Rick Mercer Report March 31st

Read more
1 reaction Share

Journey Home year one: ‘Housing First’ critical to ending homelessness

United Way has been an active participant in the Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership over the past few years. Moving people “from poverty to possibility” is one of three main goals that United Way works towards, and housing stability — a social determinant of health — is a key factor in achieving that goal.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Wildfire alarm: Climate change and health

I remember the first time I heard mention of increased wildfires as a health effect of climate change—it seemed somewhat inconsequential, a footnote compared to the heat-stress, floods, malnutrition and population displacement mentioned elsewhere. No more than that.

Read more
3 reactions Share

The path to ending homelessness in Regina

What would it take to end homelessness in Regina?

It's a difficult question, but upstream thinking teaches us that the answer lies in dealing with the causes of homelessness — not only its symptoms.

So what are the causes of homelessness in Regina?

Every instance is unique, but we can think of there being "recipes" for each situation of homelessness made up of different "ingredients", instead of more rigid causes. Many of these recipes share common ingredients, but it is their unique combinations that ultimately lead to homelessness.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Maude Barlow: On the state of Canadian democracy

Council of Canadians Chair Maude Barlow recently toured the country as part of the Go Vote! cross-Canada campaign, speaking about the state of Canada’s democracy. With the 2015 federal election set for October 19th, the goal of the campaign is to directly engage with the voting public about the kind of change people want to see in their communities, their country, and how they can come together to make it happen.
 
Upstream founder Ryan Meili spoke with Maude Barlow to hear her thoughts on the state of Canadian democracy and her predictions for the upcoming federal election.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Expanding our criteria for healthy living

“The world is not a problem to be solved; it is a living being to which we belong. The world is part of our own self and we are a part of its own suffering wholeness." 

-Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Read more
3 reactions Share

Harry Leslie Smith stands up for progress

92-year-old veteran and activist Harry Leslie Smith is visiting Regina, June 25th, as part of the Broadbent Institute’s Stand Up for Progress Tour. In advance of his visit he spoke with Saskatoon physician Ryan Meili about his history and his vision for the future.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Dreaming Healthy Nations: Closing the gap

This spring I drove up five hours to visit friends in a Northern Saskatchewan Métis community. The crosses that mark the side of the highway, more frequent the further north I go, remind me that these small communities have suffered too much loss the past winter. But I don’t see that once I arrive; the community is beautiful, a hub for fishing, hunting.

--

This post builds on an earlier post by Max.

In the spirit of building healthier relationships, here's the second feature in a new series of articles for Upstream by Max FineDay, a young nêhiyaw leader who recently finished his second term as president of the University of Saskatchewan Student's Union. In this series, Max explores the concept of the social determinants of health through an Indigenous lens, and the types of upstream interventions that could improve health outcomes for Indigenous peoples. In his own words, "My goal in this project is to explore how that idea relates to Indigenous lives, and how it might help us chart a way to a healthier balance and healthier relationships in Canada."

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Connect upstream.