Give Health A Chance: Peace as a Social Determinant of Health

This Remembrance Day, the poppies on lapels hold new meaning for many Canadians . . . our remembering needs to go beyond black-and-white photos of the great wars and include the very real effects of recent and current conflicts.

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The story of why I sold off most of my possessions and why I’m giving all the money away.

A blog from Jayden Soroka.

In September of this year I had a living estate sale. Basically, I went around my house and sold off everything I didn’t need or use on a regular basis.
Why did I do this? Over a year ago my friend Vivian and I started a campaign to recreate a guaranteed income experiment, called Mincome, that happened in the 1970’s in Dauphin, Manitoba. 

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Housing First = Results

The premise of Housing First is that providing people with the stability of housing allows them to address the other challenges they face. In the first 6 months, the numbers show that this is an extremely effective approach. 

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SDOH pioneer Sir Michael Marmot elected next president of the World Medical Association

Exciting news, Sir Michael Marmot is president-elect of the World Medical Association! 

Sir Michael has been one of the leaders in establishing and popularizing the concept of the social determinants of health (SDOH) and their role in influencing whether people lives will be long or short, whether they will be ill or well. Here at Upstream, we want to recognize and celebrate the work people are doing around the SDOH. Sir Michael Marmot is perhaps the pre-eminent example of an upstream thinking in action.

 
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The Case for Basic Income

A Blog by Vivian Belik

In 2006 I was working as an editor at my university newspaper, the Uniter, when I came across a fascinating story. One of our writers, Whitney Light, wrote a piece on a professor that was studying a town in Manitoba that had managed to eliminate poverty. It sounded like a fairytale story. 

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Poverty Costs Saskatchewan Released!

Report_thumb.PNGWe're pleased to announce the release of the Poverty Costs report, entitled Poverty Costs Saskatchewan: A New Approach to Prosperity for All. The report gives an overview of poverty in Saskatchewan and its costs, and provides evidence for the need for a comprehensive poverty reduction plan for Saskatchewan. You can find the report and the Executive Summary on the Poverty Costs Resources page.

We hope that you'll take a look at the report and circulate it widely. Thanks so much to the report authors: Upstream Policy Director, Charles Plante and Upstream Think Tank Coordinator, Keisha Sharp. And a big thanks to all of the campaign team members that contributed their time and expertise to this project!

 

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Inequality begins in the crib: Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong

This article explores the myth of meritocracy and paints a clear picture of how poverty creates systemic barriers to achieving health and well-being.   

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Reviving Riversdale: Gentrification and reconciliation in one of Saskatoon's poorest neighbourhoods

Upstream received national attention last week in an article by Allan Casey in the Walrus magazine.

Executive Director Ryan Meili shared his thoughts on the changes happening in Saskatoon's Riversdale neighbourhood where Upstream is based. He talks about his hopes for the neighbourhood and invites us to think about how Saskatoon could "be something different, something more community minded"

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"Idylwyld Drive divides Saskatoon to this day, just as railway tracks, rivers, and highways divide other cities for similar reasons. Except that lately in Riversdale, some people are trying to erase the line." writes Allan Casey.

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Canadians have one thing right: They care about health

In poll after poll Canadians rank our Healthcare system as one of our top policy priorities. Rightly so, Canadians care an awful lot about health: their own health, the health of their family and friends, and the health of their communities.

 

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Organized Labour is Good Medicine

How do labour unions make us healthier? Simply put, inequality makes us sick, and it turns out that organized labour is a good antidote. 

The Tyee argues that "labour organizing not only achieves livable wages for members, but exerts pressure against the widening income gap".

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