Catch and release

Prior to his current role at the West Side Community Clinic, Upstream founder Ryan Meili was a travelling locum physician in small towns all over Saskatchewan. His clinical experiences then and now reveal to him the limits of medicine and the importance of upstream action to address the social determinants of health.

Below is the full text of "Catch and Release", a chapter in the recently released compilation Surprising Lives of Small Town Doctors, Dr. Meili writes of encounters with illness and death in the early part of his career. 

Meili will join the book's editor Dr. Paul Dhillon and other contributors for the Saskatchewan launch at McNally Robinson Booksellers May 19 at 7:30. 

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Cultivating a real plan for Canadian food security

Over the past few weeks, we have learned a good deal about what can be done to improve food security in Canada, a key element of our collective health.

The scope of the issue is considerable, with over 3 million Canadians not getting enough to eat to 2014,  but what really stands out in PROOF's work is the growing nature of the problem.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

We can close the Canadian health gap

Add your reaction Share

Our food issues are so much bigger than overpriced cauliflower

We’ve fielded several calls lately from journalists working on stories about rising food prices. You've probably read a few: most aim to provide quick tips for how Canadians can make a dollar go further in the grocery store, and how to eat healthy for less.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

We need food policy action for health equity

We all have a personal food policy that speaks to our health, our income level, our ethical and cultural priorities. Yet if we were to look at our country, we would find it deeply divided when it comes to food.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Basic income could end food insecurity

Eating is an essential act of survival that we do every day. But eating is much more than biology. It's also social, cultural, psychological, emotional and political.

The food we eat and the circumstances we eat it in tell us who we are and where we belong in our society.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Smart policy can restore food deserts

A ‘food desert’ is an urban area where people face serious physical and economic obstacles to accessing healthy foods, especially without access to a personal vehicle.

Here in Saskatoon, we had a large food desert that was restored to sustainability by a co-operative grocery store. Now that it has closed after three and a half years of operation, healthy food access is once again a problem in Saskatoon’s inner city.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Nunavut needs a sustainable food system

Food prices are incredibly inflated in order to compensate for the high costs of shipping, storage, and running a grocery store in the north. The federal government program Nutrition North Canada aims to make foods more accessible and affordable for northern communities by applying a subsidy to healthy foods.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Canadian interest in basic income surges

Canada first experimented with universal income in the 1970s.  For decades, the evidence has told us that providing everyone with enough income to meet basic needs can be an effective, and cost-effective as a way to eliminate poverty and improve our health and well-being.

With trials beginning in Ontario, policy makers waxing optimistic, and an explosion in public interest (shown below), it seems the dawn may finally be rising for basic income in Canada.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Stop excluding the provincial north from Canada's food insecurity crisis

The ‘ice roads’ that connect remote communities in northern Canada are like busy highways in the winter. Many people travel on the winter road to get perishable goods at lower prices, or non-perishable stuff in bulk quantities. Some foods just aren’t available at all in remote northern communities. 

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Connect upstream.