Basic income could end food insecurity

Eating is an essential act of survival that we do every day. But eating is much more than biology. It's also social, cultural, psychological, emotional and political.

The food we eat and the circumstances we eat it in tell us who we are and where we belong in our society.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Smart policy can restore food deserts

A ‘food desert’ is an urban area where people face serious physical and economic obstacles to accessing healthy foods, especially without access to a personal vehicle.

Here in Saskatoon, we had a large food desert that was restored to sustainability by a co-operative grocery store. Now that it has closed after three and a half years of operation, healthy food access is once again a problem in Saskatoon’s inner city.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Nunavut needs a sustainable food system

Food prices are incredibly inflated in order to compensate for the high costs of shipping, storage, and running a grocery store in the north. The federal government program Nutrition North Canada aims to make foods more accessible and affordable for northern communities by applying a subsidy to healthy foods.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Canadian interest in basic income surges

Canada first experimented with universal income in the 1970s.  For decades, the evidence has told us that providing everyone with enough income to meet basic needs can be an effective, and cost-effective as a way to eliminate poverty and improve our health and well-being.

With trials beginning in Ontario, policy makers waxing optimistic, and an explosion in public interest (shown below), it seems the dawn may finally be rising for basic income in Canada.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Stop excluding the provincial north from Canada's food insecurity crisis

The ‘ice roads’ that connect remote communities in northern Canada are like busy highways in the winter. Many people travel on the winter road to get perishable goods at lower prices, or non-perishable stuff in bulk quantities. Some foods just aren’t available at all in remote northern communities. 

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Food self-sustainability is both possible and necessary

The price of fruits and vegetables seems to be on everyone's mind these days, as costs rise, especially imports. Canada had food import sales of $32.3 billion in 2012, with 61 per cent coming from the US.

As exporters like California struggling to maintain production in the face of challenges like climate change, Canada must aim to improve our own self-sufficiency. The key to a successful transition is to start early, with small changes.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Canada must 'grow' its capacity for health and food security

Fruits and vegetables, the necessary foods that keep us healthy, are getting more expensive all the time. Hyper-processed foods, on the other hand, are too cheap. The game is rigged for unhealthy diets in Canada.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Hungry Canadians: Changing the conversation from food charity to the right to food

Graham Riches argues that there is a need to reframe the issue of food insecurity in terms of rights, not charity. First published for Impact Ethics.

Read more
1 reaction Share

Did you get enough to eat yesterday? Four million Canadians didn’t.

More than ten per cent of Canadians experience food insecurity, which means they lack access to “sufficient, safe and nutritious food.”

But if Canada is one of the wealthiest nations in the world, why do we let so many go hungry? What should be done about it, and by whom?

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Upstream Radio: From isolation to inclusion

Upstream talks with Renata Cosic, organizer and activist for refugees and immigrants in Saskatchewan, and Don Kossick on Making the Links, on the Canadian health crises of social isolation and economic exclusion.

Read more
2 reactions Share

Connect upstream.