The story of why I sold off most of my possessions and why I’m giving all the money away.

A blog from Jayden Soroka.

In September of this year I had a living estate sale. Basically, I went around my house and sold off everything I didn’t need or use on a regular basis.
Why did I do this? Over a year ago my friend Vivian and I started a campaign to recreate a guaranteed income experiment, called Mincome, that happened in the 1970’s in Dauphin, Manitoba. 

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SDOH pioneer Sir Michael Marmot elected next president of the World Medical Association

Exciting news, Sir Michael Marmot is president-elect of the World Medical Association! 

Sir Michael has been one of the leaders in establishing and popularizing the concept of the social determinants of health (SDOH) and their role in influencing whether people lives will be long or short, whether they will be ill or well. Here at Upstream, we want to recognize and celebrate the work people are doing around the SDOH. Sir Michael Marmot is perhaps the pre-eminent example of an upstream thinking in action.

 
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The Case for Basic Income

A Blog by Vivian Belik

In 2006 I was working as an editor at my university newspaper, the Uniter, when I came across a fascinating story. One of our writers, Whitney Light, wrote a piece on a professor that was studying a town in Manitoba that had managed to eliminate poverty. It sounded like a fairytale story. 

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Poverty Costs Saskatchewan Released!

Report_thumb.PNGWe're pleased to announce the release of the Poverty Costs report, entitled Poverty Costs Saskatchewan: A New Approach to Prosperity for All. The report gives an overview of poverty in Saskatchewan and its costs, and provides evidence for the need for a comprehensive poverty reduction plan for Saskatchewan. You can find the report and the Executive Summary on the Poverty Costs Resources page.

We hope that you'll take a look at the report and circulate it widely. Thanks so much to the report authors: Upstream Policy Director, Charles Plante and Upstream Think Tank Coordinator, Keisha Sharp. And a big thanks to all of the campaign team members that contributed their time and expertise to this project!

 

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Canadians have one thing right: They care about health

In poll after poll Canadians rank our Healthcare system as one of our top policy priorities. Rightly so, Canadians care an awful lot about health: their own health, the health of their family and friends, and the health of their communities.

 

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Staying Close to the Source


Yesterday in clinic one of my patients phoned to say she wouldn't make her appointment. Buses aren't running in Saskatoon this week because of a lockout of transit workers, and she had no way to get to clinic.

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Why upstream thinking is so damn difficult: Part 2

Earlier today I began to consider why upstream thinking is so damn difficult, and now I’m going to look at three reasons as to why this is the case. Take a look at that before diving in here if you'd like a bit of a background on what I mean by "downstream" "upstream" and the metaphor of the river. 

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Bridging the Gap

Arguably, I did not have the coolest major in university. I was a political science major, with a focus on Canadian Politics. People’s eyes seemed to glaze over when I talked about what I was taking at university. I admit, compared to some of the sexier political fields like International Relations, Canadian Politics can seem a little ho-hum.  But, to me, there was nothing more interesting than understanding how our political system affected the day-to-day lives of Canadians.

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Why upstream thinking is so damn difficult: Part 1

The first time I heard about thinking upstream, it was through a little story that we affectionately refer to as our ‘founding myth’. The story goes, you’re standing on the edge of a river, the story goes, and suddenly see a flailing, drowning child.

You dive in to rescue her, only to see another child, and then another, and another. You call others over to help you. As you pull child after child out of the river, someone finally asks, “Who keeps chucking these kids in the river?” and they head upstream to find out.

 

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What does building community have to do with it?

com·mu·ni·ty

kəˈmyo͞onitē/

2. a feeling of fellowship with others, as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests, and goals.

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Connect upstream.