Jobs and Income

The Wellesley Institute and Upstream have partnered to bring to you a closer look at the health impacts of the policies that our national parties are putting forth. We know that social factors  — where you live, age, play and work — have a big impact on your health, so we ask, what are our political leaders doing to address them?

Over the next few weeks as we count down to election day, we will be looking at social issues that impact our health and reporting on how the party platforms lineup. Our health should be considered in all policies.

 

Download the full Health Equity Impact Assessment here

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A health-enhancing jobs plan is one that creates and maintains good jobs that enable Canadians to meet their day-to-day needs and plan for a secure future. 

The federal government plays an important role in creating the right economic conditions that lead to job creation. However, not all jobs are created equal and many Canadians work in precarious and insecure jobs. Precarious jobs are characterized by a lack of stability and predictability and usually do not pay well enough to allow workers to afford basic necessities like adequate housing, transportation and sufficient food. A health-enhancing jobs plan is one that creates and maintains good jobs that enable Canadians to meet their day-to-day needs and plan for a secure future. 

Low income is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and poor mental health, including increased rates of anxiety, depression, psychological distress and suicide. People with low income are at greater risk of developing diabetes and may face barriers to accessing individual-level interventions like healthy eating and regular physical exercise that can reduce diabetes risk.

Stable, secure, and adequate jobs promote good health by providing benefits, time to recover from illness, reasonable working hours, and other health-enhancing features.

 

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Connect upstream.